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Digital Event: Festival of Archaeology 2021: new finds and recent work in Wales

29 July 2021, 6.30pm - 8.40pm
Cost Pay What You Can - Suggested donation £5
Suitability Adults
Booking Eventbrite
Roman coins

© Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales.

Archaeological excavation

© Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales.

Archaeological excavation

Excavations at Tai Cochion, Gwynedd. © Gwynedd Archaeological Trust.

A celebration of recent work undertaken by the four Welsh Archaeological Trusts and Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales, presented in a series of short talks by leading experts from across Wales. This event is happening as part of the CBA Archaeology Festival.

Tickets

Timetable  

6:30pm      

Welcome by Kath Davies, Director of Collections & Research. 

Session 1: Recent work in Welsh Archaeology  

6:35pm        Speakers 

  • Excavation at Porth y Rhaw Iron Age fort, Pembrokeshire. By Ken Murphy, Dyfed Archaeological Trust. (In English, 10 minutes)      
  • Beyond Tacitus: three centuries of Roman occupation in north Wales. By Dave Hopewell, Gwynedd Archaeological Trust. (In English, 10 minutes)  
  • Contested frontiers: recent work on medieval archaeology in mid- and north-east Wales. By Dr Paul Belford, Clwyd Powys Archaeological Trust. (In English, 10 minutes)      
  • Innovation in protecting, investigating, and presenting the Industrial Archaeology of South Wales. By Andrew Marvell, Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust. (In English, 10 minutes)   
  • Questions - Kath Davies. (10 minutes)  

7:30pm        QUIZ AND BREAK (15 minutes)  

Session 2: Current work at Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales 

7.45pm 

Welcome by Kath Davies. 

7.50pm        Speakers 

  • Portable heritage: treasure for Wales. By Adam Gwilt. (In English, 10 minutes)      
  • Roman Holt: A story of local interest past and present. By Evan Chapman. (In English, 10 minutes)       
  • Early Medieval Wales - two kingdoms, two sites, two excavations. By Mark Redknap. (In English, 10 minutes)           
  • A timber from Sycharth. By Dafydd Wiliam. (In Welsh, 10 minutes)      
  • Questions - Kath Davies.      

8:35pm 

Thanks - Kath Davies. 

8.40pm 

Close. 

Speakers' Information -


Excavation at Porth y Rhaw Iron Age fort, Pembrokeshire

The spectacular fort of Porth y Rhaw is suffering from severe coastal erosion. Dyfed Archaeological Trust’s excavations in the 1990s demonstrated the high archaeological potential of the site. The Trust returned to continue excavations in 2019 and further excavations will be carried out in the summer of 2021. This short talk will describe the results of the excavations.

Ken Murphy is the Chief Executive of Dyfed Archaeological Trust. He is a field archaeologist with over 45 years’ experience in the UK. He graduated in archaeology and geography from Southampton University in 1976 and subsequently worked on number of field and other projects in various locations in England before joining Dyfed Archaeological Trust in 1979. 
 

Beyond Tacitus: three centuries of Roman occupation in North Wales

We often hear about the taking of Anglesey and Tacitus' lurid descriptions of battles with the druids but what happened after this? The Romans were here for over three hundred years or 12 generations. North Wales ceased to be a militarised zone but certainly wasn't extensively Romanised. What was going on in north Wales during this long and uneasy coexistence?

David Hopewell is a Senior Archaeologist at Gwynedd Archaeological Trust. He manages and delivers much of the organisation’s Cadw grant-aided programme of surveys and community excavations. These projects have produced ground-breaking discoveries including a Roman village on the banks of the Menai Strait and a rare early medieval settlement buried under former sand-dunes on Anglesey. He is the author of Roman Roads in North-West Wales and during the Covid pandemic has presented a series of online lectures about Roman north Wales.

Contested frontiers: recent work on medieval archaeology in mid- and north-east Wales

This talk will bring together results from a series of projects to explore new understanding of medieval Wales. The work includes excavations on Offa's Dyke and Wat's Dyke, as well as a series of Welsh and English castles, and a review of some of the planted settlements of the later medieval period. The complementary roles of research-led and development-driven archaeology will be discussed.

Dr Paul Belford FSA MCIfA is the Director of the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust. An archaeologist with a range of experience across the UK and overseas, Paul's main archaeological research interests include medieval and early historical archaeology. Paul has published widely; his most recent book was a co-edited study of urban archaeology in Europe. 

Innovation in protecting, investigating, and presenting the Industrial Archaeology of South Wales

The industrial exploitation of South Wales from the late 17th century South Wales has left a distinctive visible and buried historic environment, which extends far beyond the direct remains of particular industries but in the towns and smaller settlements that developed as a consequence of the industries. Whilst much studied by historians, landscape-scale approaches and new technologies are allowing archaeologists to characterise this landscape to inform future management and to investigate and record buried remains at scale not previously possible.  

Andrew Marvell is the Chief Executive of the Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust. He has worked in the historic environment sector for more than forty years. He is an elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists. He has directed and published the results of many excavations and overseen complex programmes of work to improve the protection and promotion of the historic environment in Wales.  He has contributed to the development of professional archaeological practice standards in the United Kingdom and strategies for the effective management, investigation, and provision of information about the archaeology of Wales.


Portable heritage: treasure for Wales

Each year, more and more treasure finds are discovered and reported by members of the public in Wales, usually metal-detectorists. Adam Gwilt will illustrate recent treasure discoveries, introducing viewers to ongoing museum reporting work. The importance of treasure as a cultural heritage resource, informing and enabling public engagements with our pasts, will be emphasised.

Adam Gwilt is Principal Curator: Prehistory at Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales.

Roman Holt: A story of local interest past and present

The small town of Holt in north-east Wales was, in Roman times, the site of kilns producing tile, brick and pottery for the Roman fortress at Chester. The site was located by a local chemist in 1905 and excavated by a local solicitor, 1907-15. In recent years the Holt Local History Society have taken fresh interest in the site, culminating in an exhibition in Wrexham Museum this summer.

Evan Chapman is Senior Curator: Archaeology at Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales.


Early medieval Wales: two kingdoms, two sites, two excavations

Between 1989-94 the museum excavated the royal crannog on Llangorse Lake (Llyn Syfaddan), within the kingdom of Byrcheiniog, followed between 1994-2012 with excavations at Llanbedrgoch, Anglesey. Contemporary but different, both shine new light on the period and two competing kingdoms.

Dr Mark Redknap is Head of Collections & Research (History & Archaeology) at Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales.


A timber from Sycharth

Owain Glyndŵr led an uprising against the English crown at the beginning of the 15th century. Sycharth, near Llansilin in Powys, was his home. In 1403 the estate was burnt to the ground by a young King Henry V. Remarkably, one timber managed to survive, and was donated to the Museum in 1931.

Dafydd Wiliam is Principal Curator of Historic Buildings at Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales.

Additional Information:

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  • Simultaneous translation will be available.

 

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