Appendix 4: Procedures to be Followed by Museum Staff in Cases of Lost/Found Children

If someone reports to you that a child is missing, inform Visitor Services staff, Security Control, Site Manager or supervisor (as applicable to your particular site) immediately, giving as full details as possible of:

  • the child’s name
  • the child’s age
  • their address/name of school
  • a physical description (height, colour of hair, clothing etc.)
  • where they were last seen
  • the time they were last seen.

Once a sufficient check is made, if the child is not found the Supervisor (Visitor Services staff) will instruct Security Control or equivalent to inform the police.

The member of staff who has had the report made to them should reassure the parent/guardian that action is being taken to locate the child and explain that contact will be maintained with them through a member of staff.

The staff member will maintain contact with the parent/guardian until the child is found by relaying messages by telephone, radio or in person.

What to do if a child who is lost comes to you

Reassure the child and contact Visitor Services staff and Security Control or equivalent with the following details:

  • the child’s name
  • the child’s age
  • their address/name of school
  • a physical description (height, colour of hair, clothing etc.)
  • where they were found.

If anyone else is with the child, ask them to remain with you until the parent/leader has been located.

If you are on your own with the child, ensure that you are in a public area where you can be seen and heard.

If the child is not claimed, the Visitor Services Supervisor or Site Manager will be responsible for contacting the local police.

Make every effort to calm and reassure the child while waiting for the responsible adult/police.

A written record will be kept by the Visitor Services Supervisor or Site Manager and relevant personnel of lost or found children and procedures followed.

Verify with the child or young person that the parent/guardian is indeed who they say they are.

If a child is found in distress, while it is appropriate to give verbal reassurances, clarify that the child wishes to be helped.