The collection of quilts and patchwork at Amgueddfa Cymru contains examples of bedcovers from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries, together with smaller items such as cushion covers, linings from christening baskets, eighteenth-century petticoats and a christening gown worn by Peter Morgan of Golden Grove in 1722. The quilt collection at the Museum dates back to the 1930s. Although a few examples of quilts had been donated to the Museum in 1914, no systematic collecting had been undertaken prior to the establishment of the Department of Folk Culture and Industries in 1932.

The collection is available to view by appointment. If you would like further information, please contact the curator using our Email Form

Commemorative quilts

Patchwork and appliqué quilt made by Mary Lloyd of Cardigan in 1840.

Patchwork and appliqué quilt made by Mary Lloyd of Cardigan in 1840.

Wholecloth quilt

A marriage quilt made by Mary Miles of Berthlwyd Farm, Quakers Yard, in 1886.

Wholecloth quilt

Detail of a wholecloth marriage quilt made by Mary Miles of Berthlwyd Farm, Quakers Yard, in 1886.

Quilt

A sateen quilt decorated with printed signatures. It was sent to the Welsh War Relief Committee in 1942 from Edmonton, Canada.

Quilt

Detail of a sateen quilt decorated with printed signatures. It was sent to the Welsh War Relief Committee in 1942 from Edmonton, Canada.

Wholecloth quilt

Detail of a marriage quilt made in Maesteg in the 1920s.

Wholecloth quilt

A wholecloth wedding quilt made in Maesteg in the 1920s.

Patchwork quilt

A quilt made from a range of printed cottons. The central panel contains a portrait of Caroline of Brunswick, consort of King George IV. Made in Brecon in about 1820.

Patchwork bedcover

An unlined patchwork bedcover. Made by the Richards family of Darowen, possibly to commemorate the building of their new parish church in 1863.

A wholecloth quilt from Abergwawr

Detail of a wholecloth quilt from Abergwawr made to commemorate Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1887.

Wholecloth quilt

A wholecloth quilt from Abergwawr made to commemorate Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1887.

Hexagonal Patchwork

Patchwork table cover

A patchwork table cover used at Llwyn Onn Hall, Wrexham. Made from cotton dress fabrics and chintzes which date from about 1780-1820.

Patchwork bedcover

A cotton patchwork bedcover made by a dairy-maid at Llanharan House, near Llanharan, in 1886.

Patchwork bedcover

A bedcover of predominantly red and lilac cotton prints. Made mid-to-late 19th century by Esther David of Llanfabon.

Patchwork bedcover

A 19th century patchwork bedcover from Cardiff. Mostly made from cotton chintzes.

Patchwork bedcover

A bedcover of hexagonal cotton prints arranged in cables. Given as a wedding present in 1874 to A. C. Humphreys-Owen of Glansevern House, Welshpool.

Patchwork bedcover

Detail of an unlined patchwork bedcover. Made in Llantrisant in 1886.

Patchwork bedcover

An unlined patchwork bedcover made in 1886 in Llantrisant.

Patchwork bedcover

A 19th century patchwork quilt from Wick. Made from a range of printed cottons.

Patchwork quilt

A quilt of red and white hexagons arranged in diagonal bands. Made by Elizabeth Edwards of Cardiff in 1870.

Patchwork: Work in progress

Patchwork bedcover

Detail of a 19th century patchwork bedcover from Cardiff. Mostly made from cotton chintzes.

Unfinished patchwork bedcover

An unfinished late 19th century patchwork bedcover from Port Talbot. Made from plain and printed cotton hexagons. The paper templates remain in parts.

Unfinished patchwork bedcover

Detail of an unfinished late 19th century patchwork bedcover from Port Talbot. Made from plain and printed cotton hexagons. The paper templates remain in parts.

Unfinished patchwork

An unfinished late 19th century patchwork from Cardiff. The 'log cabin' pattern has been achieved by dividing strips of cotton into light and dark shades.

Unfinished patchwork

An unfinished late 19th century crazy patchwork of satin, velvet and ribbed silk. Oversewn with feather stitches and French knots. Made in Maentwrog.

Unfinished patchwork

The reverse of an unfinished patchwork. The paper templates and tacking remain in position. Made in Mountain Ash in 1880.

Unfinished patchwork

An unfinished patchwork of hexagonal printed cottons. The paper templates and tacking remain in position. Made in 1880 in Mountain Ash.

Unfinished patchwork

An unfinished early 19th century patchwork from Dinas Powys. Made from printed cotton pieces arranged around an oval central panel.

Prize-winning quilts

Wholecloth quilt

A prize-winning poplin quilt made by Jessie Edwards, a quilting teacher from Merthyr. Exhibited at St Fagans during the 1951 Festival of Britain.

Wholecloth quilt

Detail of a poplin quilt made by Jessie Edwards of Merthyr. The quilt won first prize at the 1951 quilting exhibition held at St Fagans.

Quilted bonnet

A quilted bonnet made by Jane Davies of Pontardawe for the 1951 quilting competition held at St Fagans.

Quilts for children

Cot quilt

A silk cot quilt made by Miss Mabel Owen of Aberdare. It won first prize at the Royal Welsh Show held in Aberystwyth in 1933.

Cot quilt

A cot quilt made in 1987 at St Fagans National Museum of History by Katy Lewis of Caerphilly. Peach coloured cotton with polyester filling.

Patchwork cot quilt

A red and white patchwork cot quilt. Made and used in Carmarthen in 1914.

Patchwork cot quilt

A patchwork cot quilt from St David's, Pembrokeshire.

Patchwork cot cover

A patchwork cot cover used in about 1850 by the infant William Hely Llewelyn of Cwrt Colman, Bridgend

Patchwork cot quilt

A cot quilt made from printed cotton and chintz squares. Made in 1856 for William Hely Llewelyn of Cwrt Colman, Bridgend, as a seven year old child.

Patchwork cot cover

A cot cover of plain and ribbed silk patchwork arranged in the 'falling blocks' design. Made and used in St Asaph in 1870.

Quilts: Make do and mend

Patchwork quilt

A 19th century geometric patchwork quilt made from off-cuts of flannel from Ogof Woollen Mill, Drefach-Felindre. Probably made by the weaver Benjamin Jones, or a member of his family.

Patchwork quilt

A quilt made by the Borth based artist Becky Knight in 2006. Constructed from recycled Guinness cans, machine stitched to form the traditional 'drunkards path' design.

Patchwork quilt

Detail of a quilt made from recycled Guinness cans. Designed and made by Becky Knight of Borth in 2006.

Patchwork quilt

A 19th century patchwork quilt made from off-cuts of flannel from Ogof Woollen Mill, Drefach-Felindre. Probably made by the weaver Benjamin Jones, or a member of his family.

Patchwork bedcover

An early 20th century bedcover. Made in Blaenau Ffestiniog from scraps of tweed and worsted suits worn by quarrymen.

Patchwork quilt

A patchwork quilt made from a range of printed cottons. Made by an unknown quilter from Rhydlafar in about 1850.

A mid 20th century quilt from Cardiff.

A mid 20th century quilt from Cardiff. Made from rouched up silk ties. Lined with larger pieces of silk, possibly suit lining.

Paisley quilt

A reversible late 19th century quilt from Llangamarch. Made from two recycled woven and printed paisley shawls.

Patchwork quilt

A patchwork quilt made from multicoloured printed cotton squares. The filling is probably an older quilt. Made by Esther David of Llanfabon. Mid to late 19th century.

Patchwork bedcover made from 4,525 pieces of woollen cloth

A bedcover made by James Williams, a tailor from Wrexham, between 1842-52. Made from 4,525 pieces of woollen cloth, mainly off-cuts from military uniforms.

Quilts: Earning a living

Wholecloth quilt

Central motif of a wholecloth quilt made in 1933 by a group of quilters from Porth, Rhondda.

Wholecloth quilt

A cream cotton poplin quilt with carded wool filling. Made in 1933 by a group of quilters from Porth, Rhondda.

Wholecloth quilt

A reversible wholecloth quilt of pink and green cotton with a flounced edge. Made by Phoebe Walters, a professional quilter from Bancyfelin, in about 1906.

Wholecloth quilt

Detail of a wholecloth quilt of pink and green cotton. Made by Phoebe Walters, a professional quilter from Bancyfelin, in about 1906.

 

Comments(17)

Elen Phillips - Principal Curator Contemporary & Community History Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales Staff
19 September 2017, 10:31

Hi Karen

The quilt collection remains in storage as we continue to work on our new gallery spaces. If you would like to make an appointment to access the collection, please contact me through this Contact Page.

Thanks, Elen

Karen Beeson
15 September 2017, 14:35
Good afternoon, could you tell me if the quilts are now available to view please? If they are, could you also provide me with an address?
Many thanks,
Karen
Elen Phillips
6 April 2017, 10:14
Dear Gail

Thank you for your enquiry. The quilt collection remains in storage as we continue to work on our new gallery spaces. We promise it will be worth the wait! In the meantime, you will spot one or two on display in the historic buildings and you are most welcome to make an appointment to view examples in storage. However, I’m afraid we cannot fit you in the week after Easter – my diary is already full. If you would like to make an appointment over the summer, please do get in touch with me directly.

Best wishes

Elen [elen.phillips@museumwales.ac.uk]
Gail Souppouris
5 April 2017, 16:41
I was hoping to be able to visit and see the Quilt collection the week after Easter, when we are on our way to Kilgetty. Are the quilts still in storage as per your September response, or are they now out on display again? Many thanks.
Sara Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales Staff
3 January 2017, 13:01

Sumai Tudor,

Thank you for your enquiry - I will pass it on to the curator, who will either respond here or follow up with you via email.

All the best,

Sara
Digital Team

Tudor Davies
3 January 2017, 11:59

You have a wonderful collection of quilts.

My mother's family hail from Rhosllanerchrugog near Wrexham and we believe that you may have a quilt in your collection that has been made by a member of our family.

My mother's maiden name was Edwards and the family lived at Bryn Celyn, Princess St.

Would you be kind enough to look into this, and let me know if this is the case.

Hwyl fawr

Tudor Davies



Sara Huws Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales Staff
1 September 2016, 16:14

Hi Carmel,

Thank you for your enquiry.

Unfortunately, the quilting collection is currently in storage as we are currently redeveloping our indoor galleries.

However, the collection is available to view by appointment. If you would like further information, please contact the curator using our Email Form

I hope you have a great visit and thanks again for your enquiry.

Sara
Digital Team

Carmel
31 August 2016, 13:31
I enjoyed looking at the quilts on line. I plan a visit in October and was wondering how many of these lovely quilts will I be able to see when I visit.
Sara Huws Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales Staff
31 May 2016, 09:33

Hi there Judith,

I have passed your enquiry on to our curator, who will follow up with you by email.

Thanks for getting in touch.

Sara
Digital Team

Judith Walters
28 May 2016, 17:45

I really enjoyed viewing these quilts online and hope that I may see some of them in real life soon. I now live in Western Australia so the opportunity to visit St Fagans doesn't come around very often. As a child we grew up just up the road in Pentyrch and remember many visits to the museum. At some point my parents lent a family quilt to St Fagans. My sister and I often wonder what happened to it. Our family name is Yorath ( parents Mr and Mrs Dennis Yorath, 56 Heol y Pentre, Pentyrch, now deceased), it would have come into your hands in the late 1960s or early 1970s. I recall it was hand pieced hexagons, unfinished and you could see the newspaper at the back. I can still remember the musty smell and the feel of it in my hands. I have always had an interest in the "needle arts" and since giving up work last year I have developed my interest in patchwork and quilting to a much greater degree. I think this has been partly inspired by my reminiscences of the quilt.
My sister and I will be visiting Wales in September and it would mean a great deal to us to see the quilt again. I don't know if there is any record of it or even if it still exists. I certainly view quilts with much more interest and appreciation now than I did in my teens.
Regards
Judith Walters

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